Food for tramping

Having recently done a few multi-day solo tramping trips I’ve gotten reasonably good at throwing together a menu that keeps me going, doesn’t cost the earth and tastes decent. I thought I’d use my recent Travers Sabine trip as an example.

A few other things I try and keep in mind:

  1. If I’m travelling around a bit in the car before starting a trip, I won’t bring stuff that might go off without refrigeration for a few days (eg. cheese).
  2. This menu is for one person. I might plan a similar menu (just with double the quantity) for two people, but for larger groups it would make sense to use fewer pre-packed meals and use more raw ingredients. Lentil-based meals are a great option for larger groups.
  3. To conserve gas, I prefer meals/ingredients that don’t have long cooking times. Couscous requires much less cooking than rice for example (although I think rice tastes better so I’ll do that when in a hut where gas is provided ;).

Here’s the food I took for 5 nights / 5(ish) days on the Travers Sabine:

Here’s how that breaks down:

Breakfasts

  • Oatmeal (1/2 cup per morning) – combine with 1 1/4 cups water and as much milk powder as you like (maybe 1/4 cup).
  • Cinnamon/nutmeg mix and brown sugar to go on oatmeal.
  • Coffee

Snacks

  • Muesli bars
  • Whittakers peanut slabs
  • Scroggin/nut mix – I like the Pams Super Foods range – also good to sprinkle a bit of this on oatmeal at breakfast.
  • Olives
  • Energy balls (often I make these at home)
  • Gingernuts

Lunches

  • 2 days – crackers with chutney and salami
  • 3 days – Sealord tuna sachet and crackers

Pre/post dinner snacks

  • Tea
  • Cup-a-soup
  • Chocolate

Dinners

  1. Indian MTR meal with 1/2 cup couscous – these meals are super tasty and cheap ($3.50 from Pak ‘N Save) but are not dehydrated so are a bit heavy. I tend to have them just on the first night.
  2. Packet pasta with salami
  3. Packet pasta with salami
  4. Packet pasta with dehydrated peas
  5. Absolute wilderness dehydrated meal with couscous
  6. Extra/emergency dehydrated meal

Trail Runs in New Zealand’s South Island

A brain dump (in a routhly north to south order)

Anything and everything on the Abel Tasman Track. North of Totaranui tends to be less crowded and so an especially good choice. Water Taxis can provide transport if needed.

Nydia Track

From the Cobb Valley road – up the up the Lake Peel track, along the ridge track and back down to the road

Lake Rotoiti Circuit (23km)

Charming Creek Walkway (9.5km oneway)

Avalanche Peak – a good loop option from the village is to run up the Mt Bealey Track, scramble over Mt Bealey, Lyell Peak and Avalanche Peak and descend via Scotts Track.

Hooker Valley – go early to avoid crowds of tourists in the summer

Up South Temple Valley to the hut

Upper Clutha tracks (eg. Alexandra to Clyde)

Up the Dart River from Chinamans Bluff carpark (or the full Rees-Dart if you’re really keen)

Routeburn Track (and any of the other great walks in the region)

Hosting Upsource with Docker – DNS Dilemmas

Currently at work we are using an open source source code management tool called Kallithea. Unfortunately it doesn’t seem to be under active development any longer and is in general a bit unstable and lacking the features we need in a growing development team. For me the biggest pain point was not having a nice web interface to browse and review code. We’re currently evaluating other options (BitBucket, GitHub, VSO/TFS etc.) and trying to decide whether to self-host or not. This process is taking a bit of time, so I went looking for something to tide us over until we came up with a more permanent solution. This lead me to Upsource, one of JetBrains’ latest incarnations.

Upsource is web-based tool for browsing and reviewing code. The handy thing with Upsource is that it tacks onto your source code hosting tool, rather than being an all-in-one like the systems we are looking at moving to. This allowed me to quietly install it without ruffling any feathers and let members of the team decide whether or not they wanted to use it. Luckily I had a spare Linux box running Ubuntu on which I was quickly able to get it installed and hooked up with LDAP.

The interesting part came a month or later when the next version of Upsource was released (February 2017). As well as a bunch of handy new features (full-text search FTW) they also announced that new versions were being published as Docker images. This sounded like a good idea and one which would make future updates easier, so I followed the instructions to migrate my Upsource instance to being hosted under Docker. Unfortunately I found that after starting up my new version of Upsource inside a Docker container, it could no longer resolve internal URLs; neither those pointing to the source code repositories or to the LDAP server.

A bit of Googling revealed that this was a known issue with Docker on recent versions of Ubuntu: https://github.com/docker/docker/issues/23910. It sounds like it’s resolved in the latest version of Docker, but I couldn’t work out whether that had been released yet.

Luckily someone had already written up a handy blogpost showing how to get around the issue: https://robinwinslow.uk/2016/06/23/fix-docker-networking-dns/#the-permanent-system-wide-fix.

I went with the ‘quick fix’ approach described there:

  1. I ran this command to find the IP address of the DNS server running inside my company’s network. This spat out two contiguous IPs for me, so I just choose the first one.
    $ nmcli dev show | grep 'IP4.DNS'
    IP4.DNS[1]:                             10.0.0.2
    IP4.DNS[1]:                             10.0.0.3
  2. Added a –dns 10.0.0.2 argument to the docker run command I used to start the Upsource container.

Problem solved!